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to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. which we should be focusing on. >> can make it to a question? >> -- something we should be focusing on. our democracy by islamist ideology. what shall we do about the threat to democracy the case arabs are going to sort their problems out. this is the first time they're focusing on their own homegrown problems gloominess and israelis and other people. what should we do about the ideology that is focusing on destruction of democracies? >> would anybody like to take out one? >> it begins by recognizing what it is. a couple of years ago before these tahrir square movement, there is a prominent article about my son brother had. the term moderate is a separate term because to us it means someone like ice. but in reality,
's going on. we've conveyed very frankly, candidly to the chinese in both washington d.c. and beijing in my case. >> in beijing, what is the view that you can tell of kim jong-un about what power he has, who he is, what its capabilities are to stay in north korea? >> the chinese believe we need to give north korea a chance in and develop economically. china would like all the parties that are part of the six party talks to get back to the table and to see if we can't encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold and abiding by their international obligations. so that's a difference of opinion as strategy. china believes we have to engage with north korea. the united states does every time to try to engage with north korea, they basically turned around and fail to respond to their promises and live up to promises and it gets us nowhere. we don't believe we should reward bad behavior. he knocked what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you everyday? what are they looking for? >> they want gr
that will allow us to realize that over the next number of years. >> christina with the washington times, thank you for coming to speak with us. u.s. officials have said several days moved up into the region, talked about why we send ships to the region, and, also, the number one concern with north korea's planned missile launch, whether they are violating u.n., you know, international regulations or whether we're worried that they could reach a missile to reach the u.s.. what's the number one concern with that, and why are we moving ships to the region? >> the moving the ships would be today moving them today or in the long run? >> today -- this week. >> oh, okay. well, we moved ships around the region all the time. we have a fairly robust deployed naval force that's actually, you know, stationed in that part of the world. we do move them around for exercises, move them around for contingencies, and in this case, you know, should seem logical we'll move them around to have the best situational awareness that we have, and to the drug that those ships are capable of participating in ballistic mi
king leopold for the crisis. u.s. military assistance to rwanda and uganda and washington supports regimes make the u.s. compost. today the greatest challenge in resolving the alphabet soup of militia name started the lack of engagement of international community. rather it is the lack of understanding of the drivers and dynamics of the conflict stands between policy makers at yourself and the right prescriptions. for two decades the polity discourse and drc has been defined by a narrative focused on the ramifications of problems such as a neck from identity, citizenship issues, violence, booting of natural resources, but ignores her causes of the crisis. while the problem is often viewed as a disaster, which it is, drc is paralyzed by a political crisis that requires political solutions and that's where you have the greatest impact. congo has been muddling through a series of crisis for nearly two decades. the causes are well-known for weak leadership, no articulated vision in a legitimacy after the botched 111 election from a lack of capacity to resist or contain predatory dissen
for the disabled. >> and tomorrow morning's "washington journal", peter welch, on the latest development of the fiscal cliff negotiation. after that, joe shaw looks at the estate tax, which is set to go up the end of the year plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. now come in a discussion of how the military and national security might be a affected by spending cuts at the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, mike mike mullen, was joined at how services committee. this is a less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is peter peterson. i would like to give you a review of why we are supporting this project today. starting about 30 years ago, after studying the profound demographic trends, on the vast and unfunded promise we have made. i have decided was not unsustainable, but a primary threat to the future. speaking of unsustainable, in the nixon white house in which i served, the chairman of the council, if something is unsustainable,
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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